Presentation on Bi+ Issues

Scottish Parliament Cross-Party Group on LGBTI Issues

Not only are we the first bi+ specific group to be a part of the Scottish Parliament’s Cross-Party Group on LGBTI Issues, but this is also the first time that bi+ issues have been presented to the group.

We covered some of the biggest issues facing the bi+ community, including the increased risk of violence, the poor mental health outcomes, and how LGBTQ+ services fail to meet the needs of the bi+ community.

View or download our presentation.

Bi Visibility Month 2019

Bi Visibility Month Round Up!

September is always a busy month for us, as the bi+ community gets the visibility it so desperately needs.
This year was extra special, because the first Bi Pride UK took part in London on the 7th of September. We also hosted our own Bi Visibility Day event, and helped organise BiTastic, a free one day event for bi+ people and their allies.

Bi Pride UK
We arrived in Hackney after a long night on Megabus, to bi, pan, and poly flags decorating the street, and lots of people wearing their badges and flags with pride.
Over 1300 people attended The Round Chapel in Hackney for a day of all things bi+ including music, panel discussions, and information stalls.
This is now the biggest bi+ gathering in history!

Find out more about Bi Pride UK at www.biprideuk.org

GFT Screening of Velvet Goldmine

We had at least 80 people show up for this very special screening of Velvet Goldmine in 35mm, with a panel discussion about how music and musicians have been consistently providing LGBTQ+ representation for decades.
Velvet Goldmine itself is a beautiful trip of a film, and for a film with lots of sex, drugs, and rock n’roll it does a nice job of humanising the characters, where it could so easily have ended up with the greedy and depraved bisexual tropes. If you love 70s and 80s music, fabulous costumes and glamorous people then this is the film for you! 
Also, it has a cameo by Brian Molko and Placebo, as well as featuring songs of theirs.
Thank you to all our of our lovely panelists for taking part, and to the GFT and their amazing staff for making this wonderful event happen.

To find screening times or to sign up for their newsletter visit www.glasgowfilm.org

Stall at City of Edinburgh Council with their LGBT Network and UNISON
We spent our lunch on Bi Visibility Day with a stall at the main office of City of Edinburgh Council, with their own LGBT+ staff network and UNISON, talking to people about the issues facing bi+ people in the workplace.
And, thanks to the hard work of the local UNISON officer, Edinburgh councillors passed a motion to fly the bi pride flag on bi visibility day.

 

 
Panel Discussion with Edinburgh Uni Staff Pride Network, and PrideSoc
We had a lovely evening talking with the Edinburgh University Staff Pride Network, Edinburgh University PrideSoc and Monstrous Regiment publishers about all things bi+ including how representation in the media is getting better, and how a lot of us struggle with feeling ‘queer enough’ especially in LGBTQ+ spaces. 

Find out more about them at pridesoc.com and twitter.com/UoEStaffPride

BiTastic!
We were honoured to be a part of this year’s BiTastic event, a free one day event for bi+ people and their allies, organised in partnership with Equality Network, Stonewall Scotland, and Bi & Beyond Edinburgh.
There was something for everyone with discussions, crafts, information stalls, and presentations on a wide range of topics, including how to better support BAME people in the community, bi+ representation in the media, as well as safe spaces for those who are non-binary, neurodiverse, and on the aromantic and/or asexual spectrum.
It was a very enjoyable day, and we had people from all over Scotland attending, and we hope to see you all there at BiTastic 2020!

Keep an eye on www.BiTastic.org or follow @BiTasticEvents on twitter for more information about BiTastic 2020!

#BWithTheT

Unless you’ve been living in a cabin in the woods, isolated from society for the last few years, you can’t have missed the increasing hate towards trans and non-binary people in the mainstream media, and from organisations and individuals on social media.
Their basic human rights are being threatened and oppressed, and trans and non-binary people shouldn’t be left to fight that battle alone.
That’s why it’s so important to let people know that we, the bi+ community, are standing in solidarity with trans and non-binary people.

The #BWithTheT hashtag is a quick and simple way to show the trans and non-binary community that we support them.
We’ve had people coming up to us at pride because of our #BWithTheT banner, as it’s easily identifiable in a crowd, a sign of safety to many people.

B With The T Banner at Edinburgh Pride

There is a significant intersection of the trans and bi+ communities, with a large proportion of trans or non-binary people using one or more of the bi+ labels.
According to a report by MAP, more than 40% of trans people identify as bi+. Which is why our work will always be inclusive of trans and non-binary people.
And you can help as an individual by supporting Scottish Trans Alliance’s Equal Recognition campaign, more details here: https://www.scottishtrans.org/equal/ 

Cis people (of all sexualities) here’s a few tips on being a good trans and non-binary ally:

  • Normalise telling/asking people about pronouns by putting your pronouns in your social media bio(s), and by telling people what pronouns you use when you introduce yourself. If you have the ability to put your pronouns on your name badge, do so!
  • Wear or display things in your workspace that show you are an ally. This could be badges or stickers that show the #BWithTheT or say ‘trans ally’ (there’s many wonderful designs out there by many talented people)!
  • If you do accidentally misgender someone, simply correct yourself and move on, making a scene out of it can be awkward and embarrassing for the person who’s been misgendered, and it makes it all about you instead of them.
  • Practice using singular they/them pronouns, and familiarise yourself with neopronouns.
  • Instead of using (s)he or s/he in documents, use they, which is inclusive of all genders.
  • Reach out to trans and non-binary friends and let them know that you’re there to support them.

More details about the #BWithTheT campaign and to add your name to the open letter, visit BWithTheT.org

Scottish Bi+ Network turns one!!!

Unicorn Cake

It’s been a busy year for us, and we can’t believe that it’s September again!
Founded by three people who kept saying ‘someone should really do that,’ we went and did it.
Set up to provide support and resources for Scottish bi+ people, and the general public, we’ve been busy organising events, attending prides, and liaising with other groups.
When we started the Scottish Bi+ Network, we had no idea how much our services would be valued. We’ve lost track of how many people have come up to our stall at pride events and told us that they are surprised to see themselves represented at pride.
This time last year we were busy planning our very first event, a screening of Call Me By Your Name at the GFT (and we are still eternally grateful for all their help and support). It was a sold out event, and it was both amazing and slightly nerve-wracking to see so many people there!

Poster from the GFT Call Me By Your Name Bi-visibility screening and flyer from Out at the Cameo screening

We then ran workshops at BiTastic, and spoke at various events, including LGBTQ+ staff networks, building links with the community.
On the way we acquired Steve the Unicorn, our faithful mascot, who accompanies us to events.

A group of supportes with banners at Glasgow Pride and Steve The Unicorn

We started this year with Trans Pride in sunny Dundee, and recently we attended pride number ten for the year (and Bi Pride UK will make eleven)!
This year saw a return to the cinema, in partnership with Out at the Cameo.  A screening of Desiree Akhavan’s Appropriate Behaviour, which is a rare treat; a bi film, with a bi main character, made by a bi creator.
We’re the first bi+ specific group to be part of the Scottish Parliament’s cross-party working group on LGBTI+ issues.

Montage of photographs of Scottish Bi Plus Network at pride and other events

Our Virtual Meetups have been a success, and through this we are able to support bi+ people across Scotland no matter how remote their location, and even if they’re still in the closet.
We’re also one of the partners behind this year’s BiTastic, a one day event for bi+ people and their allies. With fun and games, arts and crafts, and workshops; there’s something for everyone.

Montage of photographs of Scottish Bi Plus Network at pride events

And this is the only the beginning!


We’re preparing for this year’s Bi Visibility Day event, in partnership with the GFT, a screening of the classic bi film Velvet Goldmine in 35mm.
Plus we’re currently trying to secure funding so that we can do more next year, including get to more of the Highlands and Islands, and run Bi Visibility Day events outside the central belt.

So, to everyone that has supported us this year: Thank you!

With special thanks to – Equality Network, The Glasgow Film Theatre, Bi Community News, Bi & Beyond Edinburgh, Pink Saltire, Positive Change Arts Project, Out at the Cameo, OPI Glasgow

You can see more photos of what we are getting up to on our Instagram

Bi+ at the fringe

File:St Cuthbert, Edinburgh, exterior.jpg

The Edinburgh Festival Fringe is now underway and we are pleased to report that there are a number of Bi+ themed shows and Bi+ performers!
Below is a list of the shows we are aware of so far.

“A bisexual Bridget Jones for the online generation.”

Venue 33, Pleasance Courtyard, £11

“A spin on self-worth, sexuality and spin class.

Venue 300, Underbelly, George Square, £9
“What does it mean to be bisexual? No, actually, what does it mean? Are we doing it right? How can you tell? […] an hour of comedy as confusing as coming out.
Venue 239, PBH’s Free Fringe @ The Street, Free
Collapsible:
“Collapsible is a funny, furious new monologue about holding on in this collapsing world. For anyone who has ever felt crumbly.”
Venue 139, Assembly Roxy – Upstairs, £12 (£11 Concession)
 

Fempire: Cleo, Theo & Wu by Kirsten Vangsness:
“Careening through time and place on a heroine’s journey with the women who are more than what the HIStorians have you believe.”
Venue 20, Assembly Rooms, £10 (£9 Concession)
               
If you know of any more shows to add to this list let us know via social media:
We have not seen the shows listed above so cannot vouch for the standard of representation in each one, but if you have seen the shows let us know via our social media channels.
The List has details on many more queer themed shows taking place in Edinburgh.

Virtual Meetups

Virtual Meetups


We are excited to announce that we are going to start running Virtual Meetups!
We are going to run them on the last Monday of every month, from 7pm – 9pm, through Telegram (for more information on installing and using Telegram, see their website https://telegram.org/ )
People will message us to register their interest, and invite links to the Virtual Meetup will be sent out by 6.30pm to give people time to register if necessary.
We are going to run them on a trial basis until the end of 2019, which will give us time to assess how effective they are.

What is a Virtual Meetup?

A virtual Meetup is a group chat at specific times where, in our case, bi+ and questioning people can chat to other bi+ and questioning people.
It offers a judgement free space where people can be themselves and talk about issues that are affecting them.
It runs at set times, and has at least one moderator.
Group rules can be found at the bottom of this page, and will be pinned at the top of each chat.

Who can benefit from Virtual Meetups?
Everyone!
It’s especially useful for those who aren’t yet fully out, or for those that prefer text chats over in person meetings.
Other factors like accessibility, caring commitments, and travel costs can be a barrier to people attending an in person meeting.
Also, it’s available to everyone across Scotland, even those that don’t have an in person bi+ support or social group near by.

What if I would like to meet other bi+ people in real life?
Bi & Beyond Edinburgh
www.facebook.com/biandbeyond
Social group that meets every first and third Wednesday of the month, 7pm – 9pm, LGBT Health & Wellbeing Centre, 9 Howe Street, Edinburgh.

Bi+ Glasgow (formerly Bi Scotland)
https://www.facebook.com/BiScotland
Peer support and social group, see Facebook page for more information

For general LGBT+ groups, including over 50s, trans and non-binary specific events, please visit LGBT Heath & Wellbeing’s event calendar:
https://www.lgbthealth.org.uk/whats-on/

What if I prefer to talk privately?
If you would rather talk one-to-one with a member of the Scottish Bi+ Network team, you can message us through Twitter and Facebook, or email us at contact@ScottishBiNet.org
We aim to answer all messages within 48 hours, but this is not always possible due to holidays.

My partner/friend/relative just came out as bi+ and I have questions – can I join the Virtual Meetup?
No.
The group is a safe space for those who are bi+ to talk about their experiences without judgement.
However, feel free to contact the Scottish Bi+ Network team with any questions you have, you can message us through Twitter and Facebook, or email us at contact@ScottishBiNet.org
We are in the process of putting together a guide about supporting a partner/friend/relative who has come out as bi+ and we will link it here as soon as it is finished.

Group Rules:
    1. The group is only for bi+ people, and those who are questioning their attraction to multiple genders, who are over 18 years old.
    2. This is a peer led group. It is not a therapy group nor a substitute for professional counselling or emergency services.
    3. No discrimination of any sort will be tolerated.
    4. Be respectful of other people’s pronouns, and personal identities. Just because you don’t agree with the use of a particular label, doesn’t mean that it isn’t useful for someone else.
    5. What’s said in the group stays in the group. Don’t reveal any personal information about yourself, or others. That includes your full name, email, social media pseuds, phone number, and address.
    6. This is not a place for finding dates!

Bi Representation at Pride

What is now referred to as the first pride march was organised by an openly bi activist, Brenda Howard.
She was known as ‘The Mother of Pride’ and she organised a rally for the first anniversary of the Stonewall riots, which started the tradition of pride marches and celebrations that we know today.

So why do so many bi+ people today feel like that they are not welcome at pride, or that they only belong if they’re in a same-gender relationship?
It’s time to change all that, and with a record number of pride events in Scotland this year, it’s never been easier to be a part of pride!

Depending on where you live, pride might be the only time of year that you knowingly get to spend time with the LGBTQIA+ community. It can be a positive and validating experience to be surrounded by people who understand the struggles that we face.
This is why it is so important that bi+ people are made to feel welcome at pride, and one of the easiest ways to do that is to have a visible bi+ presence at pride events.

We will be publicising pre-march meeting points for pride events where we are present, and where we know of local bi+ groups who are marching. Keep an eye on our social media to see when and where people are meeting before your local pride.
Even if you are the only bi+ person in your area (that you know of), it doesn’t mean you have to go to pride alone. Encourage friends and family to march with you in solidarity, and you might meet other bi+ people who thought that they were alone too!

Visibility is key, and it’s simple to do. Show up to your local pride with your bi/pan/poly/omni pride flags, and/or wear matching colours.


Wristbands and other jewellery can be a way of showing other bi+ people that you are part of the community without having to be out to the whole world.
Unicorns are often associated with the bi+ community, and can be another stealthy way to show others that you are part of the community.



For those of you that are looking to do more, getting involved in the organising committee for your local pride will help make future events more inclusive by adding a bi+ perspective.
Pride events are usually organised by volunteers, and if there are no bi+ people on the committee, it can be easy for the bi+ community to be overlooked.

And for those of you still unsure if you’re welcome at pride, just remember:
Pride is for the entire LGBTQIA+ community, and our allies.
That includes single bi+ people, those in mixed-gender relationships, and those who are told that they don’t look ‘gay enough’ (newsflash: we’re bi+, not gay, and we come in all shapes, sizes and races).
We’re looking forward to all the pride events this year, and we hope that we’ll see you there!

For details of pride events in Scotland see our events page which includes a calendar with all the information.

A Very Bi+ Awards Season

Usually we’re lucky if we get one film a year, with Moonlight and Call Me By Your Name bringing award-winning bi+ representation to our screens in the past couple of years.
This year, twenty-bi-teen is living up to its name. The awards season is coming to a close with the Oscars tonight, and for the first time in a long while, there’s not just a singular film with bi+ representation, but a whole collection of them!
Bohemian Rhapsody is the story of Freddie Mercury, and Queen’s, meteoric rise to fame, culminating in their historical performance at Live Aid in 1985.
The three of us that founded Scottish Bi+ Network went to see this film together, and the gasp when he said the word ‘bisexual’ was audible in a full cinema screen. It’s so rare to hear a character use the word, and especially in film. (TV is definitely better when it comes to characters actually saying the word.)
Rami Malek won a BAFTA and a Golden Globe for his portrayal of Freddie Mercury, and is also nominated for Best Leading Actor at the Oscars. In addition, the film has five Oscar nominations, including Best Picture, two wins at the Golden Globes, plus two wins and five nominations at the BAFTAs.
The Favourite is a period drama about the reign of Queen Anne, her health failing, and her close friend, Lady Sarah, governs the country in her stead. When a new servant, Abigail, arrives, her charm endears her to Sarah.
It’s a beautifully shot film, with all the surreal absurdity that people have come to expect from a Yorgos Lanthimos film. The film focuses on three complex and fascinating women, with three exceptional actresses bringing them to life. Being a period drama, no-one says the word bisexual, but the character of Lady Sarah (Rachel Weisz) is shown to have relationships with women and men.
The film has a whopping ten Oscar nominations, including Best Picture, Best Leading Actress for Olivia Coleman, and Best Supporting Actress for Rachel Weisz and Emma Stone. As if that wasn’t enough Olivia Coleman won Best Leading Actress at the Golden Globes, with another four nominations including two in the Best Supporting Actress category. Add to that five nominations and seven wins at the BAFTAs, including Best Supporting Actress for Rachel Weisz, Best Leading Actress, and Outstanding British Film of the Year.
Colette is the true story of Gabrielle Colette, who is a ghost writer for her husband’s novels, but after their success, Colette fights to be recognised as the author of the books, challenging the gender stereotypes of her era.
It’s refreshing to see a character who is unapologetic about their attraction to multiple genders. Colette (Kiera Knightley) is shown persuing relationships with both men and women throughout the film, including a relationship with a character who could be described as non-binary by today’s standards. Again, because it’s a period film, no-one uses the words bi, trans, or non-binary, which either didn’t exist then, or weren’t used the way we currently do. There are two trans actors in the supporting cast, and a sense of queerness and challenging gender norms is woven throughout the whole film.
It’s an independent film, so it hasn’t caught the eye of the big award ceremonies, but the film has four nominations from the British Independent Film Awards.
Disobedience follows Ronit (Rachel Weisz) as she returns to her Orthodox Jewish community that shunned her for her attraction to a female childhood friend. Once home, their passions reignite as they explore the boundaries of faith and sexuality.
So, my favourite thing of this year so far is definitely Rachel Weisz and the wonderfully complex bi+ characters that she’s portrayed. The film itself is understated, focusing on the characters, and brought to life by the powerful performances from the three leads. The chemistry between Ronit and Esti (Rachel McAdams) is beautifully portrayed, and their passion shines through in every scene.
The film is a low budget independent film, so it’s not on the radar of the big award ceremonies, but the film has one win and four nominations from the British Independent Film Awards.
Lizzie is a thriller based on the infamous 1892 murders of the Borden family.
The film focuses on Lizzie Borden (Chloë Sevigny), and her relationship with the maid, Bridget (Kristen Stewart, who is openly bisexual), in the period leading up to the murder of her parents. The film is bloody, and it deals with some heavy themes, but the two lead actresses do a convincing job of bringing the characters to life and showing the societal constraints that women lived under at that time. Lizzie is shown to have no interest in men, but it is stated in the text at the end of the film that Bridget went on to have a relationship with a man. It’s possibly because Bridget’s character is played by Kristen Stewart that I personally read her as bi.
Another relatively low budget independent film, nominated for the Grand Jury Prize at Sundance.
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Honourable mention: A Star is Born is the story of a musician who helps a young singer find fame, while age and alcoholism send his own career into a downward spiral.
Full disclosure: I haven’t seen the film. As far as I am aware, the film itself doesn’t have bi+ characters or themes, but it stars Lady Gaga, who is openly bisexual, and she has been nominated for Best Leading Actress at the Oscars, the Golden Globes, and the BAFTAs. And that’s in addition to her two wins and three nominations at the Grammys.
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And finally, for those of you that prefer the comfort of your own sofa to the big screen, Netflix has you covered.
Velvet Buzzsaw is a horror thriller about an unknown artist discovered after his death, but a supernatural force takes vengeance against those who profited from his work.
Stylish and fun, Jake Gyllenhaal is no stranger to playing bi+ characters, and he’s utterly mesmerising as Morf Vandewalt.
Films on streaming services very rarely get included in awards ceremonies, but it’s a fun watch if you like horror films, and don’t mind a little blood and gore.
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Even with all the bi+ characters that are making their way to our screens this year, very few actually use the word, and there’s a lack of male characters that are shown to be attracted to multiple genders.
There’s also still a notable lack of trans, non-binary, and BAME bi+ representation, as well as films that don’t focus on same-sex relationships (usually female).
This increasing trend of bi+ visibility is a step in the right direction, and I hope we don’t have to wait too long for the day when all of the bi+ community gets to see themselves represented on screen.
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For more information about the films, and for content/trigger warnings, please see the relevant IMDb page:
Bohemian Rhapsody
The Favourite
Colette
Disobedience
Lizzie
A Star Is Born
Velvet Buzzsaw

The Bi Life Review

I’m going to admit that dating shows aren’t usually my thing, and I was worried that The Bi Life would be over-the-top reality tv at its worst.

But I’m happy to say that not only is it a dating show that I could watch without cringing, but it’s also some of the best bi+ representation that I’ve seen on tv.

Hosted by Shane Janek (and their drag queen alter ego Courtney Act), who is openly pansexual, as well as genderfluid and polyamorous. The fact that the host of the show understands what it’s like lends humanity to the show, and stops it from feeling like the freak show it could so easily have been.

It opens with Courtney talking about how half of all young people in Britain identify as something other than completely straight or completely gay, according to stats from YouGov in 2015. These stats are probably not surprising to the bi+ community as we are seeing a rise in young people identify as bi+, but to the rest of the public, it may be the first time that they’ve considered that people who are attracted to multiple genders not only exist, but are a significant part of the population.

The show is a mix of fly-on-the-wall style segments when the housemates go on individual dates, with the rest of the housemates watching from the luxury of the Barcelona villa. There’s also parties and social events where everyone can mingle with the lovely guests, including some of their dates. But the show also allows the housemates the chance to talk about their experiences in their own words.

And it’s not just dating and sex that they’re always talking about. There’s a lot of discussion about assumptions and misconceptions about bi+ people, and how this has impacted them and their relationships.

It doesn’t feel forced or scripted, and there’s something lovely about the housemates all supporting each other on their journey to figure out the complicated world of dating and relationships.

As I write this, I’ve only seen two episodes, and it’s been nice to see that the housemates have all bonded quickly. For a lot of the housemates, it appears to be the first time that they’ve ever had a network of other bi+ people that they can talk to honestly.

A lot of the housemates spoke about not having the opportunity to pursue same-sex relationships in their everyday lives, and how it can be difficult when everyone assumes that they’re straight.
Also, seeing men talk openly about their feelings, is a change from the (very few) dating shows that I’ve ever seen, where guys only ever talk about what they look for in a woman in terms of physical attributes.

The diversity of the housemates is refreshing to see, not just in terms of race, but also personality-wise. Often dating shows encourage and seek out extroverts, so it’s nice to see a mix of people; from the shy Michael, who has never been on a date before appearing on the show and is looking to get some experience dating so “he knows who’s right for him,” to Mariella who is looking for a long-term relationship, with marriage and kids.

Unlike a lot of popular dating shows with housemates, there’s also no prize money, and I think that helps to create a supportive and friendly atmosphere, as there’s no worrying about whether the other housemates are going to betray them and grab the prize money for themselves. Although a nice holiday in a Spanish villa, with a pool and good company, would be more than enough of a reward for most people.

Personally, I think the success of the show comes from the fact that the housemates being attracted to multiple genders isn’t the sole focus of the show, they’re shown as real and complex people looking for friendship and love, and they’re helping to break down stereotypes and misconceptions in the process.

The Bi Life
airs at 9 p.m. on Thursday, channel E! and E! HD. Previous episodes are available to view through catch up tv.

Bi+ Flags

Photo of a bi flag
Flying the Bi Flag

Rainbow flag graphic
The rainbow or pride flag has become synonymous with the LGBTI+ community (and by some incorrectly associated with just the gay community).
Over time many more flags have been created and adopted to represent groups of people within the LTBTI+ umbrella.
Even within the Bi+ community there are various flags to represent people associated with the various labels under the bi+ umbrellaand intersecting groups or communities.
Below we give examples of just some of the flags members of the Bi+ and wider communities use. Not everyone that uses a label will necessarily recognise or associate with a particular flag, some groups will have more than one flag or associated flags have changed over time.
Bi flag graphic

Bisexual Flag

Three horizontal bands of Pink, Purple and Blue. The central purple band is narrower than the other two.
First launched by Michael Page an American activist on 5 December 1998.
RGB Codes: Pink 214, 2, 112 / Purple 155, 79, 150 / Blue 0, 56, 168 

Pan flag graphicPansexual Flag

Three equally spaced horizontal bands of pink, yellow and blue.
Creator unknown, appeared on the internet in mid-2010.
RGB Codes: Pink 255, 33, 140 / Yellow 255, 216, 0 / Blue  33, 177, 255
Poly flag graphic

Polysexual Flag

Three equally spaced horizontal bands of pink, green and blue.
The polysexual pride flag was designed by a Tumblr user with the signature “Samlin”, and first made public on the blog @f**kyeahpolysexuality on July 11, 2012.
RGB Codes: Pink 246, 26, 185 / Green 7, 213, 105 / Blue  28, 146, 246

 

The Importance of These Flags

 

Flags are a quick, visual way to show community and bring people together.
Recognising the colours of a flag (for example the Pink, Purple and Blue of the bi flag) allows for bi/queer coding of a scene, be it in an image, film or in real life. People can wear bi colours or a pin badge of the flag that they feel represents them. To many this may mean nothing, but to those aware of the flag it can act as a sign of solidarity and allows members of a particular community to find each other.
A particular colour scheme used for an organisation’s logo can also quickly identify the organisation with its target audience.
This post is a work in progress and more details will be added over time
R. 5 December 2018