June Online Socials

We’ve listened to your feedback, and we’re sticking to a single platform for our socials so that there’s less confusion!

Tuesday: 2 – 3pm on Discord
Thursday: 7.30 – 9pm on Discord
Sunday: 2 – 3.30pm on Discord

For the link to the discord server, either sign up or log in to our forum.

Even when there’s not a social, our forum and discord server are also there 24/7 if you want to chat!
And you can always message us on social media, or send us email!

There’s still time to let us know what online and telephone services would be of most benefit to you, fill in the survey here – https://forms.gle/LBobA1d7SPwdcW7N8

May Online Socials

It’s been lovely seeing you all at the online socials, and thanks to your feedback, we have expanded our online services!

Monday: 7.30 – 9pm on Zoom (video and voice chat)
Tuesday: 2 – 3pm on Zoom (video and voice chat)
Thursday: 7.30 – 9pm on Discord (text and voice chat)
Sunday: 2 – 3.30pm on Zoom (video and voice chat)

Details of the zoom meeting links for the week ahead, will be posted every Friday in the forum, and our discord server.

Our forum and discord servers are also there 24/7 if you want to chat!

If you have any suggestions for socials, or would like to volunteer to run a social, please get in touch!

Also, a huge thank you to Equality Network for enabling us to run more online socials by helping us out with Zoom pro for the next four months!

We’d also like to say a big thanks to everyone who took the time to respond to our survey about what remote support you would find useful.

If you haven’t taken the survey yet, there’s still time to share with us what online and/or telephone support would benefit you:

https://forms.gle/sb1AwUAors5qm7mL6 

Online support survey

It’s been lovely seeing so many of you at our online socials this month, and we’re looking to further develop and expand our remote services going forwards.

We want to know what types of support bi+ people would find most useful at this time.

Fill in the survey here: https://forms.gle/7UG2pd1zAA4WJ4z86

Also, feel free to get in touch by email, or through our social media channels. We’d love to hear from you!

email: web@ScottishBiNet.org
Twitter/Facebook/Instagram: @ScottishBiNet

April Online Socials

 

We’re missing being out and about and meeting all of you, but we’ve been looking at ways to do all the same things online!

We’re going to run video chats, online games nights, film screenings and more, in these time slots on our discord server until the end of April, and we’ll add more if they’re successful!

Thursday 6pm-9pm
Sunday 12pm-3pm

You can find all the details, and the link to our discord server, on our forum:
https://forum.scottishbinet.org

If anyone has any suggestions for online games, films to watch, books to read, or topics to be discussed, let us know.

And if anyone would like to run an online event, we would love to hear from you!

We Have A Forum!

We are excited to announce that we have launched a forum for bi+ people, and those who are questioning their attraction to multiple genders!

It’s something that a lot of people have asked us for, and we are happy to have another way to be able to support the bi+ community in Scotland.

You can sign up at – forum.scottishbinet.org 

Once you’ve signed up, don’t forget to check your email for the activation link!

If you would like to talk privately, or if you are an ally:
You can message us through Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram, or email us at contact@ScottishBiNet.org
We aim to answer all messages within 48 hours, but this is not always possible due to holidays and illnesses.



Presentation on Bi+ Issues

Scottish Parliament Cross-Party Group on LGBTI Issues

Not only are we the first bi+ specific group to be a part of the Scottish Parliament’s Cross-Party Group on LGBTI Issues, but this is also the first time that bi+ issues have been presented to the group.

We covered some of the biggest issues facing the bi+ community, including the increased risk of violence, the poor mental health outcomes, and how LGBTQ+ services fail to meet the needs of the bi+ community.

View or download our presentation.

#BWithTheT

Unless you’ve been living in a cabin in the woods, isolated from society for the last few years, you can’t have missed the increasing hate towards trans and non-binary people in the mainstream media, and from organisations and individuals on social media.
Their basic human rights are being threatened and oppressed, and trans and non-binary people shouldn’t be left to fight that battle alone.
That’s why it’s so important to let people know that we, the bi+ community, are standing in solidarity with trans and non-binary people.

The #BWithTheT hashtag is a quick and simple way to show the trans and non-binary community that we support them.
We’ve had people coming up to us at pride because of our #BWithTheT banner, as it’s easily identifiable in a crowd, a sign of safety to many people.

B With The T Banner at Edinburgh Pride

There is a significant intersection of the trans and bi+ communities, with a large proportion of trans or non-binary people using one or more of the bi+ labels.
According to a report by MAP, more than 40% of trans people identify as bi+. Which is why our work will always be inclusive of trans and non-binary people.
And you can help as an individual by supporting Scottish Trans Alliance’s Equal Recognition campaign, more details here: https://www.scottishtrans.org/equal/ 

Cis people (of all sexualities) here’s a few tips on being a good trans and non-binary ally:

  • Normalise telling/asking people about pronouns by putting your pronouns in your social media bio(s), and by telling people what pronouns you use when you introduce yourself. If you have the ability to put your pronouns on your name badge, do so!
  • Wear or display things in your workspace that show you are an ally. This could be badges or stickers that show the #BWithTheT or say ‘trans ally’ (there’s many wonderful designs out there by many talented people)!
  • If you do accidentally misgender someone, simply correct yourself and move on, making a scene out of it can be awkward and embarrassing for the person who’s been misgendered, and it makes it all about you instead of them.
  • Practice using singular they/them pronouns, and familiarise yourself with neopronouns.
  • Instead of using (s)he or s/he in documents, use they, which is inclusive of all genders.
  • Reach out to trans and non-binary friends and let them know that you’re there to support them.

More details about the #BWithTheT campaign and to add your name to the open letter, visit BWithTheT.org

Virtual Meetups

Virtual Meetups


We are excited to announce that we are going to start running Virtual Meetups!
We are going to run them on the last Monday of every month, from 7pm – 9pm, through Telegram (for more information on installing and using Telegram, see their website https://telegram.org/ )
People will message us to register their interest, and invite links to the Virtual Meetup will be sent out by 6.30pm to give people time to register if necessary.
We are going to run them on a trial basis until the end of 2019, which will give us time to assess how effective they are.

What is a Virtual Meetup?

A virtual Meetup is a group chat at specific times where, in our case, bi+ and questioning people can chat to other bi+ and questioning people.
It offers a judgement free space where people can be themselves and talk about issues that are affecting them.
It runs at set times, and has at least one moderator.
Group rules can be found at the bottom of this page, and will be pinned at the top of each chat.

Who can benefit from Virtual Meetups?
Everyone!
It’s especially useful for those who aren’t yet fully out, or for those that prefer text chats over in person meetings.
Other factors like accessibility, caring commitments, and travel costs can be a barrier to people attending an in person meeting.
Also, it’s available to everyone across Scotland, even those that don’t have an in person bi+ support or social group near by.

What if I would like to meet other bi+ people in real life?
Bi & Beyond Edinburgh
www.facebook.com/biandbeyond
Social group that meets every first and third Wednesday of the month, 7pm – 9pm, LGBT Health & Wellbeing Centre, 9 Howe Street, Edinburgh.

Bi+ Glasgow (formerly Bi Scotland)
https://www.facebook.com/BiScotland
Peer support and social group, see Facebook page for more information

For general LGBT+ groups, including over 50s, trans and non-binary specific events, please visit LGBT Heath & Wellbeing’s event calendar:
https://www.lgbthealth.org.uk/whats-on/

What if I prefer to talk privately?
If you would rather talk one-to-one with a member of the Scottish Bi+ Network team, you can message us through Twitter and Facebook, or email us at contact@ScottishBiNet.org
We aim to answer all messages within 48 hours, but this is not always possible due to holidays.

My partner/friend/relative just came out as bi+ and I have questions – can I join the Virtual Meetup?
No.
The group is a safe space for those who are bi+ to talk about their experiences without judgement.
However, feel free to contact the Scottish Bi+ Network team with any questions you have, you can message us through Twitter and Facebook, or email us at contact@ScottishBiNet.org
We are in the process of putting together a guide about supporting a partner/friend/relative who has come out as bi+ and we will link it here as soon as it is finished.

Group Rules:
    1. The group is only for bi+ people, and those who are questioning their attraction to multiple genders, who are over 18 years old.
    2. This is a peer led group. It is not a therapy group nor a substitute for professional counselling or emergency services.
    3. No discrimination of any sort will be tolerated.
    4. Be respectful of other people’s pronouns, and personal identities. Just because you don’t agree with the use of a particular label, doesn’t mean that it isn’t useful for someone else.
    5. What’s said in the group stays in the group. Don’t reveal any personal information about yourself, or others. That includes your full name, email, social media pseuds, phone number, and address.
    6. This is not a place for finding dates!

Bi Representation at Pride

What is now referred to as the first pride march was organised by an openly bi activist, Brenda Howard.
She was known as ‘The Mother of Pride’ and she organised a rally for the first anniversary of the Stonewall riots, which started the tradition of pride marches and celebrations that we know today.

So why do so many bi+ people today feel like that they are not welcome at pride, or that they only belong if they’re in a same-gender relationship?
It’s time to change all that, and with a record number of pride events in Scotland this year, it’s never been easier to be a part of pride!

Depending on where you live, pride might be the only time of year that you knowingly get to spend time with the LGBTQIA+ community. It can be a positive and validating experience to be surrounded by people who understand the struggles that we face.
This is why it is so important that bi+ people are made to feel welcome at pride, and one of the easiest ways to do that is to have a visible bi+ presence at pride events.

We will be publicising pre-march meeting points for pride events where we are present, and where we know of local bi+ groups who are marching. Keep an eye on our social media to see when and where people are meeting before your local pride.
Even if you are the only bi+ person in your area (that you know of), it doesn’t mean you have to go to pride alone. Encourage friends and family to march with you in solidarity, and you might meet other bi+ people who thought that they were alone too!

Visibility is key, and it’s simple to do. Show up to your local pride with your bi/pan/poly/omni pride flags, and/or wear matching colours.


Wristbands and other jewellery can be a way of showing other bi+ people that you are part of the community without having to be out to the whole world.
Unicorns are often associated with the bi+ community, and can be another stealthy way to show others that you are part of the community.



For those of you that are looking to do more, getting involved in the organising committee for your local pride will help make future events more inclusive by adding a bi+ perspective.
Pride events are usually organised by volunteers, and if there are no bi+ people on the committee, it can be easy for the bi+ community to be overlooked.

And for those of you still unsure if you’re welcome at pride, just remember:
Pride is for the entire LGBTQIA+ community, and our allies.
That includes single bi+ people, those in mixed-gender relationships, and those who are told that they don’t look ‘gay enough’ (newsflash: we’re bi+, not gay, and we come in all shapes, sizes and races).
We’re looking forward to all the pride events this year, and we hope that we’ll see you there!

For details of pride events in Scotland see our events page which includes a calendar with all the information.

Bi+ Flags

Photo of a bi flag
Flying the Bi Flag

Rainbow flag graphic
The rainbow or pride flag has become synonymous with the LGBTI+ community (and by some incorrectly associated with just the gay community).
Over time many more flags have been created and adopted to represent groups of people within the LTBTI+ umbrella.
Even within the Bi+ community there are various flags to represent people associated with the various labels under the bi+ umbrellaand intersecting groups or communities.
Below we give examples of just some of the flags members of the Bi+ and wider communities use. Not everyone that uses a label will necessarily recognise or associate with a particular flag, some groups will have more than one flag or associated flags have changed over time.
Bi flag graphic

Bisexual Flag

Three horizontal bands of Pink, Purple and Blue. The central purple band is narrower than the other two.
First launched by Michael Page an American activist on 5 December 1998.
RGB Codes: Pink 214, 2, 112 / Purple 155, 79, 150 / Blue 0, 56, 168 

Pan flag graphicPansexual Flag

Three equally spaced horizontal bands of pink, yellow and blue.
Creator unknown, appeared on the internet in mid-2010.
RGB Codes: Pink 255, 33, 140 / Yellow 255, 216, 0 / Blue  33, 177, 255
Poly flag graphic

Polysexual Flag

Three equally spaced horizontal bands of pink, green and blue.
The polysexual pride flag was designed by a Tumblr user with the signature “Samlin”, and first made public on the blog @f**kyeahpolysexuality on July 11, 2012.
RGB Codes: Pink 246, 26, 185 / Green 7, 213, 105 / Blue  28, 146, 246

 

The Importance of These Flags

 

Flags are a quick, visual way to show community and bring people together.
Recognising the colours of a flag (for example the Pink, Purple and Blue of the bi flag) allows for bi/queer coding of a scene, be it in an image, film or in real life. People can wear bi colours or a pin badge of the flag that they feel represents them. To many this may mean nothing, but to those aware of the flag it can act as a sign of solidarity and allows members of a particular community to find each other.
A particular colour scheme used for an organisation’s logo can also quickly identify the organisation with its target audience.
This post is a work in progress and more details will be added over time
R. 5 December 2018